Jenny Volvovski
Julia Rothman
Matt Lamothe
Foreword by David Macaulay    Author profile provided by WorldCat
Chronicle Books, San Francisco, CA, 2012, English    List of all editions provided by WorldCat
Design, General
8 x 10 inches, hardcover, 168 pages
ISBN: 9781452108223
Suggested Retail Price: $24.95

From the Publisher. A science book like no other, The Where, the Why, and the How turns loose 75 of today’s hottest artists onto life’s vast questions, from how we got here to where we are going. Inside these pages some of the biggest (and smallest) mysteries of the natural world are explained in essays by real working scientists, which are then illustrated by artists given free rein to be as literal or as imaginative as they like. The result is a celebration of the wonder that inspires every new discovery. Featuring work by such contemporary luminaries as Lisa Congdon, Jen Corace, Neil Farber, Susie Ghahremani, Jeremyville, Jon Klassen, Jacob Magraw, and many more, this is a work of scientific and artistic exploration to pique the interest of both the intellectually and imaginatively curious.

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Allison Arieff

No, it's not a handbook for cub journalists but rather a beautifully designed book that brings scientists and artists together to explain the “wondrous mysteries of science.” All I can say is “thank you.” I want to know how stars are born, how much of human behavior is predetermined, and how migrating animals find their way back home (especially as the parent of an inquisitive first-grader). And I can’t tell you how much easier and more pleasurable it is to grasp such concepts when they’re accompanied by such incredible illustrations. I especially appreciate the perspective of the book’s authors who were inspired by the charts and diagrams created at a time when the scientific world was still very much in early development. Back then, visual explorations helped impart a greater understanding of natural phenomena. Accordingly, the introduction applauds the plethora of information set before us but gently urges the reader that “before you do a quick online search for the purpose of the horned owl’s horns, you should give yourself some time to wonder.” Excellent advice.

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