Quote of the Day

 

178 blog entries
By David Kelley January 8, 2014

The Little Prince had a big impact in my life when I was young and impressionable. It offered my earliest lessons in prototyping, iterating, and stretching your imagination.

By David Kelley December 17, 2013

This book is the beating heart of the Stanford design project methodology. We use it liberally to help students improve their power of perception.

By Tom Kelley December 16, 2013

The book’s collection of 100 social-innovation/design projects was just the jumping off point for Emily Pilloton’s subsequent ventures: a cross-country Design Revolution Road Show, a hands-on design thinking curriculum for high school kids, a design-and-build summer camp for tween girls, and a documentary film on the power of design thinking. It’s not just a book. It’s the harbinger of a bright future.

By Chip Kidd September 5, 2013

This was the first book I read that was really about the power of design and typography. I would say that Charlotte’s typographic web-o-grams represent the first depiction of a successful ad campaign in children’s literature.

By Chip Kidd August 6, 2013

A cautionary tale of megalomania. Plus, as a soap opera it’s pretty hard to beat.

By Tom Kundig December 15, 2014

Shadows are the silent reason that objects are recognized; they give them shape. Shadows represent the soul of a place or object.

By Tom Kundig October 18, 2013

This has been an important book for my career. I’ve read it multiple times—it continues to be meaningful and I don't expect that will change. Shadows are the silent reason that objects are recognized; they give them shape.

By Phyllis Lambert September 16, 2013

When architectural history was mostly concerned, like art history, with connoisseurship, reading James Ackerman’s Palladio was a huge relief to me in 1974 when it was first published, confirming my own interest on architecture in the city.

By Julie Lasky November 5, 2013

Read it for the fresh perspective it offers on the timeless debate over photography’s value as a tool of revelation versus distortion, of consciousness-raising versus manipulation.

By Warren Lehrer November 4, 2013

Text and image are nearly inseparable. A reader needs to engage the narrative whose lines can cascade, flow, collide, and disperse. It is a completely legible read—you just need to be game to traverse time and story on Laxson’s terms—a suspension I think most readers yearn for in a good book.