Quote of the Day

 

178 blog entries
By Maira Kalman August 29, 2013

None better. Logic. Mathematics. Madness. Screwball comedy. Hallucinatory magic. And wondrous everything.

By Maira Kalman November 13, 2013

The tragedy. The grandness of the small. The tiny color phrases.

By Marco Romanelli January 20, 2014

What is an “open work”? It is work that can be different for each of us, since we are individuals, but the object is always the same. Isn’t this the best result for an industrially produced piece? It is one work, but it can be interpreted in one million different ways!

By Margaret McCurry November 17, 2014

A client of mine once very graciously referred to me as the Jane Austen of architects, saying, “She can create a small world out of a small space, a microcosm in a two-inch piece of ivory.”

By Margie Ruddick April 14, 2014

I must have read this book several hundred times as a child—a pure escape from, and then restoration to, urban life; a mix of love and loss and landscape.

By Maria Popova February 12, 2015

Artist Lauren Redniss tells the story of Marie Curie through the two invisible but immensely powerful forces that guided her life: radioactivity and romance.  It’s also a remarkable feat of thoughtful design and creative vision.

By Maria Popova August 28, 2013
Heller and Vienne provide an astute lens not only on what design is and does, but also on what it should be and do.
April 25, 2017

Read Jaron Lanier’s You Are Not a Gadget, and then read (or reread) this classic novel of a dystopian future without books. I did, and the juxtaposition is startling.

By Mark Fox March 10, 2014

I share McCloud‘s concept of “amplification through simplification” with my graphic design students every semester.

By Mark Fox December 27, 2013

This slim but dense book explores the relationship between art, advertising, desire, and capitalism. One of my favorite passages exposes the sociopolitical dimension of advertising, using the British term publicity: “Publicity turns consumption into a substitute for democracy. The choice of what one eats (or wears or drives) takes the place of significant political choice.”