Quote of the Day

 

175 blog entries
By Matteo Thun June 16, 2014

Great photos, very useful technical information.

By Ada Tolla June 9, 2014

To discover, experiment, and invent. This is all we (LOT-EK) do and it really is the only way to evolve. And it is full of unpredictable risk and actual failure—no matter how “scientifically” we try to anticipate the outcomes (as this book argues). Our evolution accelerates in leaps where so much risk is involved and we simply love it.

By Massimo Vignelli June 2, 2014

Kepes opened my eyes and made the world relevant.

By Dominique Browning May 27, 2014

I happen to love all of Hicks’s books. . . But the fabric book, written in 1971, pushes the envelope—as he did with his bold, idiosyncratic decorating style—and remains a useful eye-opener today.

By Jules Fisher May 19, 2014

How do you bottle light? Corot does not give an answer but captures atmosphere so effortlessly you will not give up the quest.

By Wim Crouwel May 12, 2014

Makes clear that modern typography does not have its origins in the conventional printing industry but is entwined with 20th-century painting, poetry, and architecture.

By Coralie Bickford-Smith May 5, 2014

I return to this book time and again to get to grips with designing patterns from this incredible wealth of technical information.

By Phil Patton April 23, 2014

Ultimately, the book is a story about hope and regret, grief, and self-expression, wrapped around an old-fashioned mystery. Champa writes. “What is a vehicle but a private capsule? One in which the mundane errands and memorable adventures of a life are accomplished. By some alchemy, through this constant association, a mingling, a transmutation, can occur.”

By Dan Formosa April 21, 2014

An insightful look into creativity both within and outside the corporation. I’ve referred many people to it.

By Stanley Abercrombie April 16, 2014

In his preface the author asks “[W]ill this study serve merely as a memorial to a defunct building type?” The book’s final words answer that “… humankind has created an extraordinary variety of spaces in which to read, to think, to dream and to celebrate knowledge. As long as humankind continues to value these activities, it will continue to build places to house them. Whether they will involve books or will still be called libraries, only time will tell.” If indeed what we now know as the library disappears, this book will be the perfect reminder of all that we will have lost.