Quote of the Day

 

170 blog entries
By Temple St. Clair January 6, 2014

I love the descriptions of the clothes and jewels—Anna’s hands, the social order depicted, from the peasants to the aristocracy.

By Jeanne Gang January 3, 2014

Skillfully uncovers the contributions of Gray, a modernist Irish designer and architect who worked in Paris in the early 20th century. It reveals the story of her life as well as her connection with Le Corbusier, who is said to have coveted the house she designed for herself and Jean Badovici in the south of France.

By Paul Marantz January 2, 2014

All you ever need to know about how we try to banish night.

By Deborah Sussman December 31, 2013

Proves that hands are still viable tools for making art.

By Amanda Dameron December 30, 2013

Whether he’s dealing with the visual pollution clogging our daily lives, the necessity of avoiding “the monstrosity of sprawl,” or the proper way to “read” a painting or a sign, Nelson is a patient but forthright teacher for training oneself to embrace the right kind of sight.

By Mark Fox December 27, 2013

This slim but dense book explores the relationship between art, advertising, desire, and capitalism. One of my favorite passages exposes the sociopolitical dimension of advertising, using the British term publicity: “Publicity turns consumption into a substitute for democracy. The choice of what one eats (or wears or drives) takes the place of significant political choice.”

By Deborah Berke December 26, 2013

A great exhortation to all of us to be questioning observers.

By André Leon Talley December 24, 2013

This is one of my favorite books, I always read it as a young boy at Christmas and loved the simple narrative. It so reminded me of my home, and my life with my grandmother: the prepping of fruit cake for the holidays, the intimate bonding of a young child to an older adult—friends between the generational divide. It’s a great, great masterpiece.

By Sheila Bridges December 23, 2013

You will be moved by the author’s strength and resilience.