Michael Bierut

Graphic Designer / United States / Pentagram

Michael Bierut’s Book List

George Lois, Paul Rand, Tom Wolfe.

18 books
Moss Hart

An account of playwriting, creativity, and collaboration by a master (along with Adventures in the Screen Trade—also on my list).

William Goldman

An account of screenwriting, creativity, and collaboration, by a master (along with Act One—also on my list).

S. Neil Fujita

The book in my high school library that launched me on my career at the age of 15, by the man who designed the Columbia Records logo and the book cover for Mario Puzo’s 1968 novel The Godfather.

Jim Bouton

My favorite book as a kid, not so much about baseball as about the loneliness and absurdity of practicing a skill under pressure and in front of an audience—themes that are common to many of the books in my list.

Ayn Rand

The designer as hero. (See also Learning from Las Vegas.)

Jerry Della Femina

Real-time account of the advertising world of the “Mad Men” years (along with George, Be Careful and Where the Suckers Moon—also on my list).

Real-time account of the advertising world of the “Mad Men” years (along with From Those Wonderful Folks Who Gave You Pearl Harbor and Where the Suckers Moon—also on my list).

Armin Hofmann

One of two books I owned when I graduated from high school that have almost identical titles but couldn't be more different. (See also Milton Glaser: Graphic Design.)

F. (Francis) Scott Fitzgerald

In what other book does a billboard get to be a main character?

Tom Wolfe

This is how to write about pop culture.

The designer as anti-hero. (See also The Fountainhead.)

Veronica Geng

Humor writing as a design exercise.

Nicholson Baker

My favorite book of product design criticism.

One of two books I owned when I graduated from high school that have almost identical titles but couldn't be more different. (See also Graphic Design Manual: Principles and Practice.)

Vladimir Nabokov

The most elegantly structured, perfectly resolved book ever written. Endlessly mystifying.

Paul Rand

His first book and still the most concise and accessible.

Randall Rothenberg

Real-time account of the advertising world of the ironic 1990s (along with From Those Wonderful Folks Who Gave You Pearl Harbor and Where the Suckers Moon—also on my list).

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